What is proper etiquette for college students needing to leave the lecture room for any reason?

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I believe that would vary from lecturer to lecturer. At my university, most of the faculties make such rules crystal clear at the beginning of the semester. Quoting the rule from one such class:

If you have any urgent work whatsoever like calls, dizziness or just don't want to sit in the lecture, walk out without interrupting anyone

While another faculty asked us to switch off phones and forget anything that is outside the lecture room unless it can't for half an hour.

But in general, if it is really important you may just politely interrupt the faculty indicating you have an urgent call and you would like to attend. In case you have some other commitment for which you may only attend a portion of the lecture, I believe informing the faculty at the beginning would be the best option so that you may just indicate to him when you leave without disturbing the momentum of rest of your batchmates. (I don't think bathroom breaks come under such category since you already have breaks between lectures for those :) )

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moonman239
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moonman239

Updated on July 31, 2022

Comments

  • moonman239
    moonman239 3 months

    Like, if I needed to use the bathroom or blow my nose or take an urgent phone call, what should I do?

    • Willie Wong
      Willie Wong over 7 years
      I, for one, have no idea what playing the trumpet means. The first two are rather different situations. So I can't even begin to imagine what you intend with your third example.
    • Alexandros
      Alexandros over 7 years
      Voting to close, so that the OP can freely "play his trumpet" by himself.
    • O. R. Mapper
      O. R. Mapper over 7 years
      @WillieWong: I have no idea what is meant, either; I am trying to find out on English SE.
    • O. R. Mapper
      O. R. Mapper over 7 years
      @gnometorule: Please read my linked English SE question meant to settle the question. What you imply is one of the guesses I had considered there, as well. That notwithstanding, the shape of a trumpet requires tremendous abstraction.
    • Nobody
      Nobody over 7 years
      I am from Taiwan. "Play the trumpet" does mean something to me (in an un-speak-able manner on this site). Unless you are from Taiwan, I don't think what you mean by it is the same as what I think it is. Please confirm. Thanks. BTW, I won't say it either here or on English SE).
    • O. R. Mapper
      O. R. Mapper over 7 years
      @scaaahu: While I will respect your decision not to explain this yourself, I find it entirely unhelpful from a language learner's perspective.
    • Nobody
      Nobody over 7 years
      @O.R.Mapper I was hoping the OP would respond to my comment above. Obviously, he hasn't. It's really a bad thing. I am afraid I would get an offensive(or rude) flag if I said it here. Please pardon me.
    • O. R. Mapper
      O. R. Mapper over 7 years
      @scaaahu: It's ok. I still think if StackExchange removes a bit of information for offensiveness on English SE when it is explaining an (offensive as it may be) expression in the respective language, SE (and many language learning sites that impose bans on language just as well) are completely missing the mark, but I will have one of my Taiwanese friends elucidate me in a private conversation and then decide whether to post the answer as an (unconfirmed) suggestion on my question (and possibly add it here, which doesn't have trumpets).
    • O. R. Mapper
      O. R. Mapper over 7 years
      @scaaahu: Either, my imagination is lacking, or I actually don't find it overly profane (at least compared to some other items on the WP page I linked to) ;) Thanks for the explanations, though; you've provided all that is necessary :)
    • Nobody
      Nobody over 7 years
      @O.R.Mapper I was thinking of sending a link here, but then I gave up later because I am not sure if it was what the OP meant. That's why I asked the OP in the comment in the first place. I'll stop here. Hopefully you'll get some answers off-line.
    • Nobody
      Nobody over 7 years
      @O.R.Mapper I saw your updated question on English. Glad to know you figured it out. More info here. There is a movie You Are the Apple of My Eye made in Taiwan in 2011. It is a very popular movie in the Chinese world. In the movie, there is a famous scene (please see "One day, ..." at the end of the first paragraph of Plot section of that Wiki page). This scene is why I guess the OP was referring to that word you mentioned on English SE. I still don't know if I am right.
    • moonman239
      moonman239 about 7 years
      When I said "play the trumpet" I think I was talking about a need to blow a nose.
    • ff524
      ff524 about 7 years
      As this is no longer unclear, I am voting to reopen.
  • Willie Wong
    Willie Wong over 7 years
    +1 If you are not suffering from the symptoms of food poisoning or similar, you probably should not leave lecture just to go to the bathroom. If you are suffering from the symptoms, I would prefer it if you just go as fast as you can and not stop by to explain. // I also 100% agree with the fact that if you are anticipating a possible important phone call, best to let the lecturer know ahead of the time.
  • GEdgar
    GEdgar over 7 years
    +1. leave quietly and unobtrusively. If it is a small class, and you know in advance that you will leave, then you can tell the instructor before class.
  • Jim2B
    Jim2B over 7 years
    It probably depends upon the size of the class too. A 3 person graduate class is more intimate, so ask to be excused. A 100 person lecture hall, just get up and go with as little noise and distraction as possible. @WillieWong, I suffer from IBD and there are many extremely legitimate reasons a student may need to leave a class and a bathroom break IS one of these. Also note that I don't consider most phone calls legitimate (I make exceptions for health and welfare of loved ones though).
  • Willie Wong
    Willie Wong over 7 years
    @Jim2B: if I have a student with a chronic medical condition like yours, I would much prefer if the student let me know way in the beginning of the class that "it's not you, it's me."
  • Willie Wong
    Willie Wong over 7 years
    In other words: If it is something that can be anticipated and explained, anticipate and explain it before hand. (1) This means you will not have to waste my class time to explain yourself, and (2) you won't be seen as impolite by me. On the other hand, if it is a true emergency: just go, and maybe explain later in an e-mail or something.
  • Jim2B
    Jim2B over 7 years
    Fair enough. I'm now in the working world and this is what I do with my co-workers. Let them know of the condition and that I may need to "cut & run" on short notice.